Warrior Wrestlers Start Shovel-Ready Service Project


Got another inspiring phone call from a coach. Chris Willertz went on a men's retreat a few weeks back and ever since he had been thinking of a creative way to get this wrestlers involved with some community service. The inspiration came: Shovels.

The wrestlers will keep the shovels at the end of the season as a “legacy.” Willertz said the shovel is “a reminder that this is what I’m supposed to do. This is what wrestling is all about—being a man and helping others out.”

Below is an article that appeared in a local paper.

Coaches - BE CREATIVE!

God bless, Lou



Warrior Wrestlers Start Shovel-Ready Service Project
Contributed By Teresa Cleary | Winton Woods Schools Communications Department

The Winton Woods High School wrestling team is armed with shovels and ready for the next snow day to help out by shoveling snow for free in their neighborhoods. Coach Chris Willertz said the team received a lot of support for their Adopt-a-Warrior program to help wrestlers with pay-to-play fees, but “didn’t get a lot of people who needed work done” in exchange for their donation. So Willertz is creating another community service opportunity for his team with the help of Winton Woods Board of Education Vice-President Tim Cleary.

“I thought it’d be a great idea to make community service part of their jobs as Warrior wrestlers,” said Willertz. On days when it snows, he’s asking his team to shovel their own driveways and then shovel their neighbors’ driveways. “I want the neighbors to know a Warrior wrestler lives in their neighborhood.”

Cleary donated 40 shovels to the wrestlers to help make sure the work gets done. “The Board and I support the team’s mission of community service and being outwardly-focused by helping others,” said Cleary.

The next snow day will start a new tradition for Willertz and his team. “We’ll shovel in the morning, practice at noon, and then go out and play,” he said.

The wrestlers will keep the shovels at the end of the season as a “legacy.” Willertz said the shovel is “a reminder that this is what I’m supposed to do. This is what wrestling is all about—being a man and helping others out.”